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The information contained on this site is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for legal advice or a lawyer. Unless you have an agreement signed with our firm, you are not represented by Hurst Immigration, PLLC and you should not consider the information contained herein as legal advice and you should check with your own counsel before relying on this message. This information is not intended to be create and the receipt of this information does not constitute an attorney-client relationship.

 

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Citizenship

Making a decision to become a United States citizen is a very important step.  Before you begin your journey, make sure you are on the right path.  The first step is to determine your eligibility for citizenship or naturalization.  In general, to become a United States citizen you must have been a permanent resident for at least five or three years.During the past five years of your residency, you must have maintained continuous residence in the United States.  Also,as a permanent resident, you must not have any disqualifying convictions or have voted in any U.S. election.

If you meet the eligibility requirements, you are ready to file your application for citizenship.  While you may complete the application on your own, it is always best to consult with an experienced immigration attorney to determine if there are any circumstances that might prevent you from obtaining your citizenship.  As part of the application process you will be asked if you are willing to take an oath of allegiance to the United States.  Be sure you understand this oath and are willing to affirmatively take the oath during your naturalization interview.

At your naturalization interview the immigration officer will ask you questions about your application.  You will also be questioned on U.S. history, U.S. government, and the constitution.  Some individuals are exempt from certain portions of the naturalization exam.  If you pass the exam, you will be at the end of your journey.  We would love to be part of your journey to citizenship.  Call today to schedule a free initial consultation.